Speakers

Jerzy
Bodurka

Laureate Institute for Brain Research

Megan
deBettencourt

University of Chicago

Michelle
Hampson

Yale University

Annette
Horstmann

Max Planck Institute

Stephen
LaConte

Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute

David
Linden

Cardiff University Maastricht University

Nick
Turk-Browne

Yale University

Susan
Whitfield-Gabrieli

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Kathrin
Cohen Kadosh

University of Surrey

Rainer
Goebel

Maastricht University

Talma
Hendler

Tel Aviv University

Mitsuo
Kawato

Advanced Telecommunications Research Institute International

Hakwan
Lau

University of California,
Los Angeles

Kenneth
Norman

Princeton University

Takeo
Watanabe

Brown University

Kymberly
Young

University of Pittsburgh

ORGANIZED BY:

Michal Ramot, Luke Stoeckel, Javier Gonzalez-Castillo, and Alex Martin

SPONSORED BY:

National Institute of Mental Health

Agenda

Thursday, March 28, 2019
DAY 1: NEUROFEEDBACK METHODS, ANALYSIS, AND DESIGN
7:45-8:45 a.m. Registration
8:45-9:00 a.m. Introduction and Logistics
Session 1 Methods, Analysis, and Mechanism

Moderator: Michal Ramot, National Institute of Mental Health

9:00-9:40 a.m. Investigating Neurofeedback Mechanisms and Semantic Feedback Using Ultra-High Field fMRI

Rainer Goebel, Maastricht University

9:40-10:20 a.m. Real-time Multivariate fMRI Analysis in the Cloud

Kenneth Norman, Princeton University

10:20-10:40 a.m. Break
10:40-11:20 a.m. Decoding-Based Closed-Loop Neuroimaging

Stephen LaConte, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute

11:20 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Neural Mechanisms of Decoded Neurofeedback and Data-Driven Approach for Clinical Applications

Mitsuo Kawato, Advanced Telecommunications Research Institute International

12:00-1:30 p.m. Lunch (on your own)
Session 2 Issues in the Experimental Design of a Neurofeedback Study

Moderator: Javier Gonzalez-Castillo, National Institute of Mental Health

1:30-2:10 p.m. Intermittent Compared to Continuous Real-Time fMRI Neurofeedback Boosts Control Over Amygdala Activation in Healthy Volunteers

Annette Horstmann, Max Planck Institute

2:10-2:50 p.m. Time Course of Clinical Change Following Neurofeedback

Michelle Hampson, Yale University

2:50-3:10 p.m. Break
3:10-3:50 p.m. fMRI-Neurofeedback in Psychiatry and Neurorehabilitation – How to Move to the Next Level of Clinical Validation?

David Linden, Cardiff University/Maastricht University

3:50-4:30 p.m. Critical Issues When Designing Randomized Clinical Trials for Neurofeedback Interventions

Kymberly Young, University of Pittsburgh

4:30-5:00 p.m. Discussion
Friday, March 29, 2019
DAY 2: CLINICAL AND COGNITIVE APPLICATIONS
8:00-9:00 a.m. Registration
Session 1 Clinical Applications

Moderator: Luke Stoeckel, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

9:00-9:40 a.m. Emotional Training of Amygdala Activity with Real-time fMRI Neurofeedback and EEG Recordings and its Effects on Electrophysiological Brain Activity in Depression and PTSD

Jerzy Bodurka, Laureate Institute for Brain Research

9:40-10:20 a.m. Clinical Implication of Amygdala Neurofeedback: Aims and Challenges (Why and How)

Talma Hendler, Tel Aviv University

10:20-10:40 a.m. Break
10:40-11:20 a.m. Real-Time fMRI-Based Neurofeedback and the Developing Brain

Kathrin Cohen Kadosh, University of Surrey

11:20 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Real-Time fMRI Feedback Targeting the Default-Mode Network Reduces Auditory Hallucinations in Individuals with Schizophrenia

Susan Whitfield-Gabrieli, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

12:00-1:30 p.m. Lunch (on your own)
Session 2 Changing Cognitive States Through Neurofeedback

Moderator: Alex Martin, National Institute of Mental Health 

1:30-2:10 p.m. Decoded fMRI Neurofeedback Changes Both Visual and Cognitive Functions

Takeo Watanabe, Brown University

2:10-2:50 p.m. Decoded Neuro-Reinforcement Allows Double-Blinded Studies of Unconscious Associations

Hakwan Lau, University of California, Los Angeles

2:50-3:10 p.m. Break
3:10-3:50 p.m. Closing the Loop: Tracking Cognitive States in Real Time

Megan deBettencourt, University of Chicago

3:50-4:30 p.m. Manipulating Representational Similarity to Induce Category Learning and Perception

Nick Turk-Browne, Yale University

4:30-5:00 p.m. Discussion

Logistics

The Natcher Conference Center is located at 45 Center Drive on the NIH Campus in Bethesda, MD. We encourage you to use public transportation, such as the Metrorail subway system, which has a convenient stop (Medical Center) on the NIH campus.

Visitors will be required to go through security at the NIH Gateway Center. They will be required to show one (1) form of identification (a government-issued photo ID-driver’s license, passport, green card, etc.) and to state the purpose of their visit. Please visit the NIH Visitor Information Site for important security and travel information prior to your visit.

Registration

Access Registrations – Logistics Staff Only